The battle for the Internet begins Sept 10th

Remember, remember the 10th of September

This post originally appeared on Engine.is, a progressive public policy institute dedicated to supporting the growth of technology entrepreneurship and one of the lead organizers of the international movement to save the Internet from a proposed FCC policy. Today, they announced a coordinated effort for September 10th. Using a widget, found here, some of the web’s biggest companies are going to simulate a slowed Internet experience, mimicking “the slow lanes” that the FCC ruling would create. Dwolla thoroughly supports and relies on the ecosystem provided by an open Internet. This blog will be  participating in the #InternetSlowdown and we invite you to do the same.

Internet users, advocates, and major tech companies will come together next week to make their voices heard: the time for real net neutrality is now. A long­ awaited decision from the FCC on the future of net neutrality is imminent, and we’re excited to see companies that depend on an open Internet rallying together to let the FCC know once and for all that an Internet with fast lanes and slow lanes is unacceptable.

On September 10, major Internet companies—including Foursquare, Automattic, Vimeo, Reddit, Mozilla, Etsy, and Kickstarter—will join Engine and other tech advocacy organizations for a day of action that will give a glimpse at what the Internet might look like if the FCC’s proposed rules go into effect, and net neutrality as we know it is left by the wayside. Under the FCC’s proposal, Internet providers will be free to charge for access to special Internet “fast lanes,” leaving startups and others unable to pay these new tolls in slow lanes. In such a world, startups that can’t pay for fast lane access could see their sites slow down, their traffic vanish, and their funding dry up, harming the Internet and the economy.

For the Internet Slowdown on September 10, many participating companies will install widgets on their sites to show how the Internet would function in a world without net neutrality. Others, including Engine, will direct their users to call or email policymakers. With over one million public comments already filed with the FCC, much has been written about why the FCC’s proposed rules would damage the Internet, but the FCC needs to see firsthand how Internet fast lanes would devastate startups.

To help make sure the FCC gets the message, join Engine and companies like Foursquare, Automattic, Vimeo, Reddit, Mozilla, Etsy, Kickstarter, and Dwolla on September 10 to slow down the Internet and show why real net neutrality rules are necessary to the future of an open Internet. For more information on the Internet Slowdown, visit Battle for the Net or email [email protected]