How we’re different (Episode 2)

Dwolla is a payment network, but it doesn’t operate in the same way a lot of other systems do. We’ve been building a series of images to demonstrate how Dwolla works in general and how Dwolla compares to other systems.

We shared Episode 1 with you a few months ago, and now we introduce you to Joe and Gino’s Italian Restaurant as they process a traditional credit card payment in this Episode 2. We realize not all consumers feel the same pain a merchant might, but if you have a few favorite local businesses, consider the impact paying with Dwolla can have on the health of their business. Do something nice for the merchant, pay with Dwolla :)

 

 

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  • http://twitter.com/ejboyl Ed Boyle

    so, then, if Gino’s can reduce their cost of taking payment from $0.48 to $0.25, they’d save $0.23 which is approximately a 35% increase in their net profit on that sale.

  • joewired

    I am Joe! :(

  • adfadfadf

    I think you can do a better job with your tutorial. This is pretty sad.

    • http://twitter.com/CaityLJones Caitlin Jones

      The infographic is to demonstrate how Dwolla’s network operates differently than the credit card networks, and therefore how we can keep our transaction fees as low as they are. We are definitely open to suggestions in how to better communicate these differences.

  • slow willy

    very confusing

    • http://twitter.com/CaityLJones Caitlin Jones

      Credit card payments and all of the things going on in the backend can be pretty confusing. If you have any specific questions about the graphic, I’d be happy to get the answers for you!

      • Roy

        its the presentation , that’s the problem not the content , the content is OK. we can hardly read it.

  • Florida Robert

    How do I use it at a RETAIL level?

    • CaityJones

      A user installs the free Dwolla app on their Android or iOS phone, and can pay merchants instore that accept Dwolla as a payment option. The merchant can verify this payment by having their customer show them their payment confirmation screen, the Dwolla Kiosk (http://blog.dwolla.com/retail-merchants-rejoice-web-kiosk-online/) or using the free Dwolla merchant app that can be downloaded on iOS or Android devices. Dwolla users can also pay online merchants that accept Dwolla via whatever checkout process they have in place, whether that’s a plugin in their shopping cart, the Off-Site Gateway, HUB page, etc. Here’s some information that you may find useful in regards to online retail: http://developers.dwolla.com/bd/why. Let me know if I can get you any other information, I’d be happy to help.

  • Sam

    I appreciate the efficienty of the transaction over the plastic, but with the benefit being experienced by the recipient, this model does not lend to wide acceptance by those who spend. It takes a great deal of incentive to alter public behavior.

    • CaityJones

      I agree, taking out a piece of plastic and swiping it has become the norm for a lot of spenders. However, we ask people to think of their favorite small business owners that suffer from the high fees that these cards bring with them, and that many times the merchant has to increase their prices in order for their customers to continue to pay with plastic and earn their reward points. Consumer adoption is key, and we’re consistently working on ways to make the process of paying with Dwolla more user-friendly.

      • Sam

        I am all for change when the status quo, being plasitc, can be better. My only observation is Dwolla adopting more of a business view will help. It takes a lot of quarters to cover payroll and expection of investment returns :-)

        • CaityJones

          With a new network and a new market, comes new opportunities for revenue ;)

  • D.E.

    This may be a great illustration of how a credit card transaction actually works but it fails to show how dwolla works therefore leaving the consumer just as far in the dark as before seeing this. Also what is all this I have been reading on rip-off reports about a hidden $3 monthly fee for enabling “instant” transactions with no way to opt out of it if you accidentally had a box checked for it?